Welcome!

August 1, 2011 § 4 Comments

Welcome to the NC Dance Festival’s new blog!  Tune in every week during the Festival season for photos, interviews, and other behind-the-scenes information on the Festival and the performing artists!

First, a look back at the Festival over the years.  Last year we produced this video to celebrate our 20th Anniversary season.

In the coming weeks, look for reflections on the Festival by its Artistic Director, Jan Van Dyke, as well as the first of many profiles of the performing artists.

The season starts soon, so be sure to mark your calendars:

Raleigh

September 9-10, 2011 at 8:00pm

Jones Auditorium at Meredith College

Charlotte

September 16-17, 2011 at 8:00pm

Robinson Hall at UNC Charlotte

Boone

October 27-29, 2011 at 7:00pm

Valborg Theater at Appalachian State University

Greensboro

November 4-5, 2011 at 8:00pm

Aycock Auditorium at UNC- Greensboro

Wilmington

February 24-25, 2012 at 8:00pm

February 26, 2012 at 3:00pm

Community Arts Center

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§ 4 Responses to Welcome!

  • Anonymous FOR NOW says:

    I am only writing this because I have experienced this for too long in North Carolina, more specifically, Charlotte. I attended a Friday night performance of NCDF at UNCC and I was, once again, embarrassed and in awe from the lack of technique, choreographic skills, artistry, . . .With the exception of the last 2 pieces, it baffles me how any of these collaborations could be chosen to represent dance as a SERIOUS art form.
    With America having such a strong backbone and history of great modern dance icons such as Graham, Limon, Weidman, Humphrey…one would think that these figures had a lot more to offer educationally rather than dismissing the notion all together. I mean, seriously, most of these performances looked like something a teenager would do in front of a mirror in their bedroom. And these choreographers all have degrees in dance!? Really!?
    -No sense of spacing.
    -Very weak technique.
    -Phrasing was beginner at best.
    I mean, c’mon. I would like to know who was on the NCDF panel and what kind of bureaucratic BS was happening here.

    Let’s get with it! We learn from the past and we continue to use what is good and solid while integrating new ideas and strategies of today.

    Anonymous FOR NOW.

    • Thanks for your comment. It is important that we have continue to have conversations like this to ensure the vitality of our field!

      There were a few things in your post I wanted to respond to:
      First of all, while most of the works on each program are chosen by NCDF to tour to all the sites, there are also local artists selected in each city to show work. The Charlotte artists selected in this way were Camerin McKinnon, Kim Jones, Sarah Emery, E.E. Balcos, and Audrey Baran.

      As for the NCDF adjudication process, a panel that usually includes 2 Dance Project Board members, our Artistic Director, and 2 other members (local students or other members of the community) review all the submissions in a blind review—they do not know which choreographer submitted which work. Each reviewer makes recommendations and scores each work; the dances that score the highest overall are generally the ones invited to join the touring roster for that year. Of course, at times, the choreographers selected cannot accept the invitation, or other situations arise that modify the choices made from the adjudication process. Occasionally, we approach choreographers directly in order to round out the touring roster or fill vacancies that have opened from the originally selected artists.

      We are committed to presenting the works of North Carolina dance artists in many forms, and strive to represent the diverse styles and interests within the NC dance community. We also try to represent artists in various stages of their careers, and from multiple parts of the state. If there are artists working in the state whose choreography you would like to see on the program, encourage them to apply! Application guidelines can be found on our website: http://www.ncdancefestival.com. And please, continue to support the dance community in your area and across the state; we can only grow and improve with robust support from audiences and other dancers.

    • Bob says:

      To Anonymous for now,

      You seem to be a very unsupportive and unappreciative audience member. It is unfortunate that you feel you have to publicly slur the efforts of dance makers and performers, and throw negativity to dance enthusiasts. As a supporter of the festival I find that the organization tries to be inclusive throughout the statewide and local communities and perhaps succeeding in presenting a wide-range of dance aesthetics. I wonder if you would have enjoyed Saturday night, which had a different program. Friday night the two local artists representing Charlotte had wonderful audience reception including the last piece that was apparently exempted from your judgment. You seem to want to show your intelligence about modern dance history. Maybe you could access the concept of inclusion and open-mindedness about those who take risks and make efforts to dance and share dance or understand that dance evolves into an infinite amount of artistic processes. So, perhaps it is simply a matter of your blog etiquette and personal aesthetics or you are just a very angry dance devotee who never got a chance. If you have so much knowledge and experience with dance, how are you contributing to dance as a “SERIOUS” art form in North Carolina?

  • […] August 1, 2011: We launched this blog!  Read our first post here. […]

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